Category: Entrepreneurship

Commercial Due Diligence Period

I am currently in the midst of a deal that I am very excited about! Upon settlement, I will have control of a building that is in excess of 217,000 sqft with strong positive cashflow at approximately 80% occupancy. The building is used as a dry storage facility. It does not have any climate control, so the merchandise contained within the building cannot be prone to freezing.

The ultimate plan is to redevelop the property as mixed use residential, office, retail, etc… The building is three stories high and zoned as CBD (Commercial Business District). This is the ideal zoning which will allow the first floor to be comprised of office space and retail allowing the second and third floors to be residential. There is going to be quite a bit of work ahead once we reach closing. My plan is to take ownership and then take a few months to stabilize and get my bearings around the existing revenue generating businesses.

The structure itself is red brick, steel, and concrete with old pine wood flooring. It was used as a manufacturing facility for many years before being converted into the current use. The building materials lend themselves as the perfect canvas for some very unique and elegant feeling apartments. I can easily envision spaces with large industrial style windows, fourteen foot ceilings, exposed brick walls, wood floors, and industrial style HVAC systems. The layout allows for an abundance of light. I feel that the floor plan design could be a little tricky, but I have confidence that a good architect and designer could determine the be utilization of space without sacrificing the historical charm of the building. Of course, I do have a contingency plan of continuing / growing existing storage functions in the event that the redevelopment plans become too cumbersome of a hurdle.

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Photo of the inside of the building

Before any of the design plans can get underway, I need to get to closing and ensure that I am making a solid business investment. below are some of the things that I am gathering throughout the course of due diligence.

Contracts:

– Elevator maintenance 

– Snow removal

– Security deposits

– Roof maintenance 

– Trash removal

– Test control

– Hazardous waste removal service

– LP (liquid propane) service


It is extremely important to review any contracts that are currently in place because they will most likely come with the sale of the building; unless there is language stating that they are non-transferrable or contain some sort of cancellation clause. You do not want to get stuck with a bad contract or one that you can’t live with. It is important to review these contracts before the expiration of your due diligence period so that you can negotiate any disagreeable terms with the seller.

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Exposed brick walls and natural light

Building / business documents to ask for:

– Leases / operating agreements

– Roof warranty

– Mechanical issues

– Elevator permits

– Environmental consulting (environmental discovery)

– Building and fire code violations (get from municipality)

– Building permits 

– Financial records (ie. aging reports)

– Insurance and declarations page

It is always a good idea to ask for more than what you think that you will need. Carefully review all of the leases for any kind of cancellation clauses, tax agreements, or rent restrictions that may impact your plans following the acquisition. One of the documents listed includes the roof warranty. Was the roof recently installed? If so, it is most likely under some kind of warranty. Make sure that you are persistent with getting this information because roof issues can lead to some extremely crippling expenses.

Aging reports are helpful to gain insight on whether the rents are being paid and which tenants may be trouble for you in the future. Unfortunately, you can’t always trust the seller of a property to provide you with accurate information. Additionally, if you are financing the purchase of the building, then your lender may require you to provide rent payment history reporting. Speaking of financing, ensure that you have a complete list of everything that the lender will need in order to close on the building. You will not want to wait until the days leading up to closing to realize that you’re missing a vital document. This will delay closing and add unnecessary stress to the transaction.

The insurance and declaration page is something new that I have added to the list. The building involved in this particular deal has a very high insurable value. It has made obtaining a policy a little more complicated than usual. I am looking to obtain the contact information and insurance terms under the seller’s current policy. Perhaps the property is currently under insured, which will impact the overall P&L and the CAP. In any case you will always want to make sure that any property that you own is insured properly. Understating the value could have major implications in the event that you ever need to file a claim. You could end up getting nothing from a policy that you had been paying into for years if you’re not honest.

There is a lot involved with the due diligence period. The broker that you are working with should be knowledgeable in the areas of real estate that you are investing in. You may also wish to hire a real estate attorney to help review the leases, contracts, and overall deal. Regardless of who is on your team, I would recommend becoming educated yourself. This will help you to ask the right questions of your team and to ensure that they are qualified. I recommend reading the following book: The Due Diligence Handbook For Commercial Real Estate: A Proven System To Save Time, Money, Headaches And Create Value When Buying Commercial Real Estate. It is available on paper as well as audio and it is a very quick read. Investing an hour of your time could save you thousands of dollars on your investment.

I would love to hear from you about your real estate endeavors. What other information do you ask for during a due diligence period? What went right? What are some opportunities and areas that you will improve before making your next deal?

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My First Day As An Entrepreneur

Anxiety runs high on the first day of doing something new. Think back to the first day of school every year, moments before a competition, or your first day on a new job. You probably don’t sleep well as you lie awake in bed with countless, and often meaningless, scenarios of how the day will go running through your head. Let’s face it, starting something new is downright terrifying!

These feelings were not a part of my first day of entrepreneurship, however. It’s safe to say that I really didn’t know what I was starting. It just seemed to be a natural and happened organically. I didn’t ever consider putting the title of business or entrepreneurship on it until now. As I reflect back on how I was first introduced to a world of entrepreneurship, this moment is it.

The setting is sometime in the early to mid 90’s. I was a tall and fairly uncoordinated middle school aged kid. As you may recall in a previous post, I grew up in a rural area and attended Catholic School. This is important to note for a couple of reasons. One there wasn’t a lot to do when I was a kid. I didn’t grow up in a city or neighborhood where you could simply walk to a friend’s house or even ride your bike. My friends were generally a 15 minute drive, or more, away. This meant that my brother and sister would often be the only kids around to play with.

My brother is a little over 5 year older than I am. So by this time he was in high school and we didn’t really have a lot to relate to other than the Boy Scouts and the fact that we shared a bedroom growing up. I was always just a bit too far behind in age to be cool enough to be included with him and his friends. As I started high school, he was making his way off to college. Always just a step behind.

My sister is 2 years younger than I am. We had the complete opposite relationship than what I had with my brother, because my sister actually thought that I was cool. Rather than try to compete for my brother’s attention and try to keep up, I simply hung out with my sister more often. With that came, what I will call sacrifices, where I would be obligated to play doll house and My Little Pony. Embarrassingly, I had the only male My Little Pony, Texas Pete, so that I didn’t have to play a girl pony. This may seem like irrelevant information, but it will soon make sense, I promise.

Spending time with my younger sister introduced me to things that I would not have otherwise been interested in doing. My mom encouraged us to be creative and crafty. We had what we called an “arts and crafts cabinet” in the basement which was always fully stocked with construction paper, glue, popsicle sticks, wiggly eyeballs, etc… it had everything that you needed to come up with some pretty spectacular creations.

At one point we really got hooked on creating jewelry using those little plastic beads. We would test out the different threads that would be easy to thread through the beads yet durable enough so that they didn’t easily snap, which would leave beads scattered all over the floor. There would be shopping trips to the bead aisle at our local Ben Franklin Arts store, where we would look for the shiniest and most colorful beads. We even had containers with partitions that wouldn’t let your beads mix, unless you accidentally turned the container upside down which resulted in hours of sorting. This happened quite frequently.

I would be threading beads almost every chance that I had. The bus ride from our rural home to school ranged from 2 1/2 hours when I was in kindergarten to a little over an hour at this point in my life. The difference in ride time is that my mother complained to the school district enough to get dedicated bussing for the private schools “over the mountain.” Mom would always go to bat for us, and she still would. When I was in kindergarten, I would catch the bus at 5:15 in the morning and be driven all over the county. First one on and the last one off. I’m sure that there are those of you reading this that can relate!

discman.jpgThese bus rides were the perfect time to sit and make jewelry. This was before cell phones and the plethora of mobile entertainment devices. Granted there were Gameboys and Sega Game Gears, but those were the kind of luxuries that my parents didn’t want to spend their hard earned money on. The only portable device I had was a Walkman which was eventually upgraded to a Discman. A Discman was a portable CD player for those that don’t know what I am talking about. “What’s a CD,” you ask? Yikes. It is hard to believe that technology has evolved so quickly.

One day while making beaded jewelry on the bus, a girl asked me if I could make her a bracelet. I said yes, but she went on to say “I can pay you for it.” Suddenly, the inner monologue began playing out. I would have just given her a bracelet, but she is willing to pay me for it? If I can get a couple of dollars, I would be able to buy more beads and make even better jewelry, which I could turn around and sell for more money. This was all very exciting to me! Also, we weren’t really friends or anything so I said sure and we negotiated a price of a couple of dollars.


This continued for a while. I was making “custom” beaded jewelry on the bus and selling it to the other students. Eventually, I had saturated the limited market, so I began making keychains and other crafts. 


From crafts, I moved on to candy. My parents had a membership to one of those club stores where you can buy a huge bulk container full of candy for much less than you can buy pieces candy individually. I would have my parents pick up Airheads and Now and Laters in bulk. I had a silver metal tin container that I would fill with candy and take on the bus with me. I would sell the candy for ten cents each or three for a quarter. I would sell a few dollars worth everyday and the good news was that the demand was always there for more candy. I was the candyman through the remaining years of grade school and gave it up when I started riding the bus to high school. 


Even though these are examples at the tiniest level and no one would be able to support themselves with these activities, they got me excited for business and gave me a little bit of walking around money at a young age. It was in those very moments that I began to understand the very basic mechanics of business. I just didn’t know it at the time. 


I feel like I was fortunate to have accidentally fallen into this learning opportunity. I often wonder how we can teach children these lessons at a young age to plant the seeds of entrepreneurship. Give them the power to be creative and find opportunities to not only make money but be innovative in identifying needs.


Can you remember your first lesson in business? Was it organic or did you have a mentor? How are you using what you had learned through that experience in your life today?

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